Good Day Pharmacy https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com Good Day Pharmacy Fri, 17 Feb 2017 19:10:32 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Good Day Pharmacy Co‐Owner Appointed to Medicaid Rate Review Advisory Committee https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/press-release/good-day-pharmacy-co%e2%80%90owner-appointed-to-medicaid-rate-review-advisory-committee/ Mon, 12 Dec 2016 21:35:11 +0000 http://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/?p=6634 Loveland, CO – September 1st, 2015: On Thursday, August 20, 2015, Good Day Pharmacy Chief Executive Officer, David Lamb, was appointed to the Medicaid Rate Review Advisory Committee by Colorado House Representative, Brian DelGrosso.
The Medicaid Provider Rate Review Advisory Committee (MPRRAC) was enacted in June of 2015 (Senate Bill 15‐228) and operates in accordance with the Colorado Medical Assistance Act, Section 25.5‐4‐401, C.R.S. (Colorado Revised Statutes). This Committee assists the Department in the review of provider rate reimbursements in Medicaid. The committee is responsible for reviewing reimbursement cycles and voting to make necessary adjustments, taking public comment from stakeholders on whether rates should be examined out of cycle, reviewing any rate increase proposals or petitions sent to the Department, and making recommendations to the Joint Budget Committee on areas for process rate improvement.
Good Day Pharmacy is an independent, family‐owned company with nine pharmacies in Northern Colorado, and employs 133 Colorado residents. It is co‐owned by David Lamb, Vicki Einhellig, and Nancy Lamb. Collaboratively, all three owners serve on several organization boards: Rx Plus, Independent Pharmacy Cooperative, Independent Advisory Board, Poudre Valley Health System Ethics Board, Long Term Care Network, and local community associations. Good Day Pharmacy participates with the Wyoming Medication Drug Program (WMDP) which provides immediate prescription help and advice on lower‐cost alternatives, and improves prescription access for Wyoming residents who cannot afford medications. Good Day also hosts internship programs and student rotations for pharmacy school students and pharmacy technicians.

Contact:
Karen Price
Director of Marketing, Good Day Pharmacy
kprice@gooddaypharmacy.com
3780 E. 15th Street
Loveland, CO 80538
Ph: 970‐461‐1975 ext. #343

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Good Day Pharmacy Principal Appointed to Colorado State Board of Pharmacy https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/press-release/good-day-pharmacy-principal-appointed-to-colorado-state-board-of-pharmacy/ Mon, 12 Dec 2016 21:33:35 +0000 http://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/?p=6632 Loveland, CO – September 24, 2015: On Monday, September 14, 2015, Good Day Pharmacy Chief Operating Officer, Vicki Einhellig, RPh, was appointed to the Colorado State Board of Pharmacy by Gov. John Hickenlooper as he announced several Boards and Commissions appointments. Ms. Einhellig’s term on the board will run through July of 2019.
The Colorado State Board of Pharmacy serves under the National Association of Boards of Pharmacy (NABP) to protect public health by promoting the highest standards of pharmacy practice through effective licensure and enforcement of regulations. In short, the Board examines applicants, holds disciplinary hearings to issue and revoke pharmaceutical licenses and inspects pharmacies.
“I am excited and flattered to be appointed to this professional board of dedicated people who want to set the highest of standards for the pharmacy industry in Colorado,” said Ms. Einhellig.
Good Day Pharmacy is an independent, family-owned company operating under the Health Mart umbrella with nine pharmacies in Northern Colorado, and employs 140 Colorado residents. Its principals are David Lamb, Vicki Einhellig, and Nancy Lamb. Collaboratively, all three owners serve on several organization boards: Rx Plus, Independent Pharmacy Cooperative, Independent Advisory Board, Poudre Valley Health System Ethics Board, Long Term Care Network, and local community associations. Good Day Pharmacy participates with the Wyoming Medication Drug Program (WMDP) which provides immediate prescription help and advice on lower-cost alternatives, and improves prescription access for Wyoming residents who cannot afford medications. Good Day also hosts internship programs and student rotations for pharmacy school students and pharmacy technicians. This year, Good Day Pharmacy celebrates its 30th year in business, providing community pharmacies for residents of Northern Colorado.

Contact:
Karen Price
Director of Marketing, Good Day Pharmacy
kprice@gooddaypharmacy.com
3780 E. 15th Street
Loveland, CO 80538
Ph: 970-461-1975 ext. #343
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Good Day Pharmacy Grand Opening Celebration January 20, 2016 https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/press-release/good-day-pharmacy-grand-opening-celebration-january-20-2016/ Mon, 12 Dec 2016 21:26:21 +0000 http://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/?p=6629 Longmont, Colo. – Good Day Pharmacy is hosting a Grand Opening Celebration on Wednesday, January 20, and would like to invite its neighbors to experience the unique services that make this pharmacy a special part of the community.
“We are truly grateful to be energizing the Longmont community’s pharmacy experience with our new and improved pharmacy location. Our staff look forward to servicing Longmont residents for many more years to come from our new pharmacy location at 1749 Main Street. We can’t wait to see everyone at the Grand Opening celebration on Wednesday, January 20,” said Marketing Director Karen Price.
The Wednesday, January 20, Grand Opening will take place from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., and will include a ribbon cutting ceremony at 1 p.m., food and refreshments, special customer giveaways (while supplies last), and a grand prize drawing to win a Kindle Fire, FitBit, or one night stay at the St. Julien Hotel and Spa in Boulder, Colorado. Additionally, Good Day is also celebrating 30 years in business this month, since opening in Loveland, Colorado, at the very end of December 1985.
Good Day Pharmacy in Longmont is a full service pharmacy open six days a week. Convenience and service are paramount. The store is a traditional retail pharmacy offering everything you come to expect from a pharmacy. Some of their many specialty services include synchronized prescription refills, prescription compounding, home and office delivery, vaccinations, medical equipment and supplies.
The dedicated staff work hard to make sure you have less wait time and have more access to their time, service and expertise. Once again, the Good Day Pharmacy Team is at your service! Stop in and see for yourself, and meet the friendly and caring pharmacy staff!

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
Karen Price, Marketing Director
1749 Main Street
Longmont, CO 80501
970-461-1975 ext 343

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Good Day Pharmacy Ranked #1 and Best In Class for Medication Therapy Management https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/press-release/press-release-1/ Mon, 28 Nov 2016 20:23:46 +0000 http://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/?p=6594 Loveland, CO – February 29, 2016: Good Day Pharmacy has achieved many recent successes, including celebrating 30 years in business, and the opening of a new Longmont, Colorado pharmacy. Now the successful independently owned pharmacy chain has been identified as “Best In Class” by OutcomesMTM® for providing medication therapy management services (MTM). The Best In Class designation means that Good Day Pharmacies in Eaton, Ft. Collins (at Sprouts Farmers Market), and Wellington have each achieved the rank of top 15% of all MTM centers in the U.S. And another huge triumph for the locally owned company, Good Day Pharmacy at Heritage Market in Eaton, Colorado, is ranked number 1 in Colorado. Good Day Pharmacy Manager, Allisen Cole, and her team have helped create a successful process for MTM, escalating them to the top team in Colorado.
Medication therapy management (MTM) has become a main focus at Good Day, and is a service that not all pharmacies offer. In a volume‐oriented industry that seems somewhat monopolized by mail order “telephone” pharmacies, personal face‐to‐face service and clinical advice is not always deemed priority. Some independent pharmacies, like Good Day, are looking to turn this around in a time when quality and patient education are once again becoming important to payers. The goals of MTM are to help the patient better understand their medications, how to use them properly, and how to achieve better health because of it.
As MTM providers, Good Day pharmacists proactively identify MTM eligible patients and provide CMR’s (comprehensive medication reviews) to reinforce patient understanding and ensure coordination of care. Good Day pharmacists also provide targeted intervention which focuses on gaps in care, non‐adherence, high risk medications and cost‐saving opportunities for both the patient and the insurance company. In both processes, pharmacists are involved in making a face‐to‐face difference for patients with health issues such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and patients using high risk medications. Again, the ultimate goal is better health outcomes for patients.
“This is an incredible accomplishment and we are so proud of the work of our pharmacy teams, and our focus in making MTM a company priority,” said Vicki Einhellig, COO and principal of Good Day Pharmacy. “Allisen and her team, as well as our Wellington and Ft. Collins teams, have set this up as a group effort, and their Best In Class and number 1 rankings are wonderful validations of their work, and is a huge honor.”
Good Day Pharmacy is an independent, family‐owned company operating under the Health Mart umbrella with nine pharmacies in Northern Colorado, and employs 133 Colorado residents. Its principals are David Lamb, Vicki Einhellig, and Nancy Lamb. Collaboratively, all three owners serve on several organization boards: Rx Plus, Independent Pharmacy Cooperative, Independent Advisory Board, and Long Term Care Network. Good Day Pharmacy participates with the Wyoming Medication Drug Program (WMDP) which provides immediate prescription help and advice on lower‐cost alternatives, and improves prescription access for Wyoming residents who cannot afford medications. Good Day also hosts internship programs and student rotations for pharmacy school students and pharmacy technicians. This year, Good Day Pharmacy celebrates its 30th year in business, providing community pharmacies and personal, face‐to‐face pharmacy service for residents of Northern Colorado.

Contact:
Karen Price
Director of Marketing, Good Day Pharmacy
kprice@gooddaypharmacy.com
3780 E. 15th Street
Loveland, CO 80538
Ph: 970‐461‐1975 ext. #343
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Fun in the Sun or Defeat in the Heat? https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/general/fun-in-the-sun-or-defeat-in-the-heat/ https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/general/fun-in-the-sun-or-defeat-in-the-heat/#respond Mon, 18 Jul 2016 19:32:03 +0000 http://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/?p=6015 Did you know that the number of hot days and warm nights is increasing? In the U.S., record high temperatures now outnumber record lows at least two to one. What can you do to protect yourself in a heat wave—or simply in the hot summer sun?

13698072_1095191917205902_8218313555128283827_oKnow signs of trouble. Heat cramps are an early sign that your body is suffering from the heat—they’re more likely with heavy exercise or work. Along with muscle cramps, you may sweat heavily and feel very thirsty or fatigued.

Heat exhaustion can happen when you lose lots of fluids from heavy sweating. These are a few other signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion:

  • Headache
  • Dizziness or feeling weak or confused
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Cool, moist skin
  • Dark-colored urine, a sign of dehydration

If not treated, heat exhaustion can develop into heatstroke, which can be deadly because the body loses the ability to cool itself. Call 9-1-1 if someone shows signs of shock, becomes very confused, has a seizure, has a fever over 102 degrees F, breathes rapidly or has a rapid pulse, or loses consciousness.

Nip problems in the bud. If you have symptoms of heat exhaustion, get out of the heat as quickly as you can. Rest in a cool, shady place with your feet raised. Drink plenty of fluids, but avoid alcohol or caffeine. Apply cool compresses or take a cool shower or bath. Contact a doctor if you don’t feel better within 30 minutes.

Beat the heat. In a heat wave, take these steps:

  • Avoid taxing activities if you can.
  • Stay indoors during the hottest hours of the day. The sun’s ultraviolet (UV) rays are strongest between 10 am and 4 pm.
  • If you don’t have air conditioning, go to a library, mall, or other public place to cool down for a few hours.
  • Wear lightweight, loose-fitting clothing. Avoid dark colors, which trap the heat.
  • Use a hat or umbrella outdoors.
  • Allow your car to cool off before you get in.
  • Drink water and eat small meals often. Drink less alcohol and fewer caffeinated drinks.
  • Don’t take salt tablets unless your doctor tells you to.

Protect those at increased risk. Help protect those who are most vulnerable in the heat. That includes children, older adults, and people who are obese, ill, exercising vigorously, or not used to the heat or high humidity.  For example, make sure young ones drink plenty of water. And you might check in on your elderly neighbor once in a while.

It’s important to know that certain medicines can also increase your risk of heatstroke. This includes allergy, blood pressure, and seizure drugs as well as medicines used for mental health conditions. If you have a chronic condition, it’s a great idea to ask your doctor about other ways to lower your risk of heatstroke.

 

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

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7 Screening Tests for Women https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/general/7-screening-tests-for-women/ https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/general/7-screening-tests-for-women/#respond Fri, 06 May 2016 20:49:32 +0000 http://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/?p=5914 May is the month when many women celebrate Mother’s Day. Maybe breakfast in bed, homemade cards, extra hugs….? It’s pretty wonderful to feel so cared for. But how well do you take care of yourself?

One big piece of self-care involves regular screening tests, which can prevent many health problems—or help you nip them in the bud as early as possible. Life can get hectic, though, so it’s easy to forget or to put it off. Here is a brief overview of the tests the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends for women. Remember: these are guidelines only. Talk with your doctor about your unique needs.

  1. Blood pressure test. Starting at age 18:
  • Get tested at least every 2 years if your blood pressure is lower than 120/80.
  • Get tested once a year if your blood pressure is between 120/80 and 139/89.
  • Discuss treatment with your doctor if your blood pressure is 140/90 or higher.
  1. Bone mineral density test.
  • At age 50, ask your doctor if you are at risk for bone disease (osteoporosis).
  • At age 65 or older, have at least one bone mineral density test. Ask your doctor whether you need repeat testing.
  1. Breast cancer screening.
  • At age 40, discuss your risk with your doctor to decide if you need regular mammograms.
  • Starting at age 50, have a mammogram every 2 years.
  • At age 75, ask your doctor whether or not you need to be screened.
  1. Cervical cancer screening.
  • Starting at age 21, get a Pap test every 3 years if you have a cervix.
  • Starting at age 30, you can get a Pap test and human papillomavirus (HPV) test together every 5 years if you have a cervix.
  • At age 65 or older, ask your doctor whether or not you need a Pap test.
  1. Cholesterol test. Starting at age 20, get a regular cholesterol test if you are at increased risk for heart disease. Ask your doctor how often to do this.
  2. Colorectal cancer screening. From age 50 to 75, get screened for colorectal cancer. This may include one or more tests, such as fecal occult blood testing, sigmoidoscopy, or colonoscopy. Ask your doctor which test is best for you and how often you need it.
  3. Diabetes screening.

Starting at age 18, get screened if your blood pressure is higher than 135/80 or if you take high blood pressure medicine.

In addition, if you’re sexually active, ask your doctor whether or not you need any special tests.

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

 

Sources:

  1. OWH: “Screening tests for women.” Available at: http://www.womenshealth.gov/screening-tests-and-vaccines/screening-tests-for-women/ Accessed 4-2-16.
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Is It an Allergy—or Is It a Cold? https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/general/is-it-an-allergy-or-is-it-a-cold/ https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/general/is-it-an-allergy-or-is-it-a-cold/#comments Tue, 05 Apr 2016 17:05:09 +0000 http://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/?p=5864 Spring has sprung—or it’s just about to. That means spring allergies are “blooming,” too. But sometimes it’s hard to tell the difference between a cold and a seasonal allergy, also known as hay fever. Here are some signs to look for and ways to find relief.

2FC537B500000578-3408988-image-a-173_1453336346751Know the signs.  Both colds and allergies can cause sneezing, stuffiness, or a runny nose. But there are telltale differences between a cold and seasonal allergy. Ask yourself these five questions. The more times you answer “yes,” the greater the chance the culprit is a seasonal allergy.

  1. Are plants starting to flower (or leaves starting to fall?) A change of season means this is more likely an allergy—your body’s response to airborne allergens (substances such as pollen that cause allergies). Colds are most common in winter months, and are caused by viruses that can show up in any environment.
  2. Did your symptoms appear suddenly and last more than a week? Cold symptoms tend to appear more gradually but go away more quickly.
  3. Are your eyes watery and itchy? Allergens can inflame the clear membrane covering your inner eyelid and eyeball.
  4. Are you free of a fever? Allergies don’t cause fevers, but colds can.
  5. By contrast, a thicker discharge that is still clear or cloudy may indicate a cold. Conversely, yellow or green discharge can accompany a bacterial infection that may need professional evaluation, especially if the duration is over 2 weeks.

Limit triggers. Birch, cedar, cottonwood, and pine are big allergy triggers in the spring. Other plants that cause problems depend upon where you live.

Just when you’re itching to get outdoors after a long winter, you may be better off staying inside. Try to limit your outdoor activities on days with high pollen counts—especially between 10 am and 4 pm, when pollen counts are highest. Windy days are the worst because wind can really kick up the pollen. You can find pollen counts for your area through the National Allergy Bureau (NAB). Here you can also sign up for personalized email pollen alerts.

In addition, keep windows closed at home and in your car. For extra protection, you might try adding a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter to your furnace or air conditioner. It also helps to take an afternoon or early evening shower to keep pollen off your pillow. Likewise, at the end of the day, wipe off any pets that have been outdoors. Consider taking off your shoes before coming inside to keep from tracking in pollen and adding a HEPA filter to your vacuum cleaner to help decrease any pollen that does find its way in.

Allergy relief aids. Oral antihistamines treat symptoms such as sneezing and itchy nose or throat. “Second-generation” antihistamines have a much lower rate of causing sedation than do the older medications, and have generic equivalents, making them very cost-effective.  Nasal or oral decongestants can help with nasal stuffiness, but are not appropriate for all patients. Antihistamine eye drops relieve itchiness. Nasal inhaled steroids are available over the counter to help decrease the body’s sensitivity to allergens, but they take some time to take full effect, as does NasalCrom, an OTC mast-cell stabilizer that stops the allergic cascade from starting.  Please don’t hesitate to ask questions if you have side effects or to see how long you can safely use these drugs.

If OTC drugs don’t do the trick, you might want to see an allergist, a doctor who specializes in treating allergies. Some people need other medications or allergy shots to feel better.

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice.  You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

 

Sources:

  1. Nemours Foundation: “A Cold or Allergies: Which Is It? Available at: http://kidshealth.org/en/parents/coldvsallergy.html Accessed 2-25-16
  1. AAAAI: “Pollen Count Stations.” Available at: http://www.aaaai.org/global/nab-pollen-counts.aspx Accessed 2-25-16.
  2. AAAAI: “Spring Allergies.” Available at: https://www.aaaai.org/Aaaai/media/MediaLibrary/PDF%20Documents/Libraries/EL-Spring-Allergies-patient.pdf Accessed 2-25-16.
  1. WebMD: “Allergy Relief Tips Wherever You Go.” Available at: http://www.webmd.com/allergies/allergy-relief-10/spring-allergies Accessed 2-25-16.
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7 Questions To Ask Your Pharmacist https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/general/ask-for-help-from-our-pharmacists/ https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/general/ask-for-help-from-our-pharmacists/#respond Mon, 22 Feb 2016 17:39:16 +0000 http://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/?p=5787 Your local pharmacist is a key member of your healthcare team and is there to offer a wide variety of patient care services as well as answer your questions related to medication use. Here are a few ways you can improve your health by visiting your hometown pharmacy.

1. Questions about your prescription medicine dosage or possible drug interactions? Pharmacists are happy to go through your doctor’s instructions on each prescription to ensure it doesn’t interact or interfere with any other medications and to provide helpful advice to be sure it is taken properly.

2. What are the side effects of this medication? What should I do if they occur? Which side effects need medical attention?

  • Some side effects are very serious, and require immediate medical attention, while others are milder. It is very important to be aware of all possible side effects, mild and serious, prior to starting a new medication.
  • Before you decide to stop taking a medication because of side effects, ask your doctor or pharmacist whether there is another way to handle it, and to be sure you’re taking the medication correctly.

3. Is a generic version available? Generic versions can cost up to 75 percent less than their brand-name counterparts. Most insurance companies require pharmacists to fill all prescriptions with generic versions, but not every prescription has a generic equivalent. If your doctor has written “DAW,” which is code for “dispense as written,” on the prescription, your pharmacist must give you the brand-name version. If you get to the pharmacy only to realize this has happened, your pharmacist can contact the doctor to see if you really need the brand-name version or if the generic will be as effective.

4. Looking into a dietary supplement or herbal remedy? Ask your pharmacist first. About one in four people taking prescription medications also take a dietary supplement, herbs, and/or vitamins which may augment or antagonize the actions of prescription and nonprescription drugs.  Ask your pharmacist to check for any negative interactions with drugs or other supplements you’re taking.

5. Might you be allergic to your medication or one of its ingredients?   A compounding pharmacist can help find a solution when you or a loved one (including furry friends!) are allergic to one of the ingredients, or just can’t tolerate it.  For instance, dyes, binders, and fillers may be able to be omitted from a prescription by having the medication compounded.

6. Fighting a cold or seasonal allergies? A pharmacist can assist you in finding the right over-the-counter products for your symptoms, so you can get back to feeling better, faster.

7. Need immunizations before travel OR something as simple as a flu shot? Most pharmacists are certified to vaccinate to help protect you from illnesses. Most pharmacies will bill insurance for vaccinations, and can give some vaccinations without an appointment. Since some vaccines require special attention and ordering, calling ahead is recommended, depending on the vaccine.

 

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice. You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

 

 

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Healthy Heart Habits: Life’s Simple 7 https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/general/healthy-heart-habits-lifes-simple-7/ https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/general/healthy-heart-habits-lifes-simple-7/#respond Fri, 05 Feb 2016 22:08:29 +0000 http://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/?p=5715 top-10-foods-to-control-cholesterol-levels--increaAs you started into the new year, did you resolve to have healthier habits? Many people do. But a long-term study found that Americans are not doing as well as they were 20 years ago in maintaining a heart-healthy lifestyle. And that increases their chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or heart disease.

Life’s Simple 7. In the study, the percentage of Americans who met all these heart-healthy lifestyle goals—what the American Heart Association calls Life’s Simple 7—dropped from 8.5 percent to 5.8 percent:
• Eat a balanced diet.
• Be active.
• Manage your weight.
• Don’t use tobacco.
• Maintain ideal levels of blood sugar, cholesterol, and blood pressure.

Best for women. In the past, it was thought that hormones protected women from heart disease until menopause. Now we know that’s not the case. But two recent studies show that there may be subtle differences in what’s best for women and men.
In one study, women who followed these six habits cut their risk of heart attack by a whopping 92 percent.
• Don’t smoke.
• Maintain a normal body mass index (BMI).
• Exercise—moderately to vigorously—at least 2.5 hours a week.
• Watch no more than seven hours of TV each week.
• Drink no more than one alcoholic beverage each day.
• Eat plenty of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and fish or omega-3 fatty acids. Limit sugary drinks, processed and red meats, trans fats, and sodium.

Even women who adopted just one or two of these healthy habits lowered their heart risk, with a normal BMI having the greatest impact.
Best for men. A Swedish study tracked 20,000 men and found that men with the following habits cut their risk of heart attack by 86 percent:
• Don’t smoke.
• Eat a healthy diet.
• Drink no more than two alcoholic drinks a day.
• Stay physically active, for example, walking or cycling at least 40 minutes a day.
• Maintain a waist circumference of less than 37 inches.
For men, healthy diet and moderate drinking appeared to have the most impact on reducing their heart risks.

Know your numbers. So where should you begin? One place to start is to know your numbers. That includes blood sugar, cholesterol, and blood pressure—as well as your weight. The next step is to talk with your doctor about ways to improve.
Your pharmacist or physician can also give you tips on tracking—and improving—these critical numbers. For example, if you want to track your blood pressure at home, they can advise you on how best to do that. Remember: High blood pressure is a “silent killer,” so the only way to know whether or not it’s lurking is to check it.

In fact, nearly 30 percent of Americans have high blood pressure. And, nearly half don’t have it under control with either lifestyle habits or medication. If your doctor has prescribed blood pressure medication, be sure to take it. For some people, that’s the only way to keep it at bay.

Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice. You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

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Fighting Disease with Exercise https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/general/fighting-disease-with-exercise/ https://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/general/fighting-disease-with-exercise/#respond Thu, 07 Jan 2016 19:43:18 +0000 http://www.gooddaypharmacy.com/?p=5672 It’s certainly not a cure-all. But it’s pretty impressive.

Exercise is one of the few things that can help prevent or slow the development of most—if not all—major health problems. High blood pressure, high cholesterol, heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, arthritis, bone loss—to name a few. Topping things off, exercise can help ease the aging process, for example, by strengthening and stretching muscles and joints.
In no time at all, you may also notice other subtle changes from exercise: more energy, less stress, firmer muscles, better-fitting clothes. Some pretty nice bonuses, don’t you think?

WinterWorkoutBigstockHeart benefits. Your heart is one of the organs that benefits the most. That’s a muscle you really can’t afford to ignore. Exercise helps your heart by:
• Strengthening it, making it a more efficient pump
• Reducing high cholesterol and plaque buildup
• Reducing blood pressure
• Helping you manage your weight

Recent exercise research. Recent studies shed a little more light on the many benefits of exercise. For example, one study underscored the link between physical and emotional health: People who had exercised 10 years before having a heart attack were 20 percent less likely to have depression after the event than those who had been inactive.
And, then there’s the matter of mental health. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign used brain scans to compare the strength of brain connections in younger and older adults. As expected, younger adults had stronger brain connections. But older adults with a low-to-moderate range of endurance had stronger brain connections than those who were inactive. This suggested that even moderate levels of physical fitness can boost long-term brain function.
In other cases, short bursts of high-intensity exercise may have greater benefits. A new Canadian study suggests it might help people with type 2 diabetes more than longer sessions of less intensity activity. Participants in the high-intensity group had twice the improvement in blood sugar levels as those in the low-intensity group. Why is this so? Researchers aren’t sure. The higher- intensity workouts may use energy in a different way. Another plus? People can fit this kind of workout more easily into their busy schedules.

Walking tips. So what kind of exercise should you do? The possibilities are endless. Look at your daily routines for how to incorporate more walking, for example you could walk up the stairs instead of using the escalator or you could set up a walk schedule with a friend. For many people, walking is a great choice. It’s easy to do and doesn’t need to cost a dime. Now, that’s a cost-effective approach to aging and fighting disease!

Try these tips:
1. Warm up by walking slowly for the first 5 minutes.
2. Increase your speed for about 15 minutes
3. Use long strides, but walk at a comfortable pace for you.
4. Swing your arms, point your toes straight ahead, and keep your back straight and head up.
5. End your walk at a slower pace.
6. Do some gentle stretches while you’re still warmed up.5
No matter the exercise program, start slowly, especially if exercise is new to you. Before you begin, you might consider talking over your plans with your doctor.
Nothing herein constitutes medical advice, diagnosis or treatment, or is a substitute for professional advice. You should always seek the advice of your physician or other medical professional if you have questions or concerns about a medical condition.

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